Hands of Darkness by Heather James

1609555_734353786599112_1268552769_n Evelyn Barrett has a new baby and a new job as a police consultant. She helped the police solve the murder of her young daughter and is now trying to move on with her life since she can no longer work as a lawyer.

Hands of Darkness
by Heather James
Kregel Publications
February 2014

Hands of Darkness by Heather James was a good book but I had a hard time getting involved in the story. Evelyn Barrett can no longer practice law so she has taken a job as a police consultant and will be working with Detective Thatcher. She worked with him to help solve the kidnapping and murder of her young daughter. At the beginning of the book she is almost at the end of her pregnancy and has the baby before the middle of the story. Working as a police consultant allows her to be at home with her newborn son and to work only hours that are convenient. At least that was the way it was supposed to be. The first case she works on involves a very sadistic serial rapist and murderer who is very methodical in his killings. He leaves absolutely nothing at the scene that would lead to his identity so Thatcher and Evelyn have a very tough job in bringing him to justice. The case becomes very personal for Evelyn when her good friend Jen is raped but somehow manages to survives.

The author did an excellent job in the development of the characters. I had a problem liking the main character for she had so many quirks in her personality that simply rubbed me the wrong way. The description of scenes, especially ones that involved a dead body, were so real that I felt as if I were a witness to what was happening. I love a good police drama, even with murder thrown into the mix, but this story just seemed almost too dark for my taste. The villain was so evil that I cringed every time I read what he was thinking and doing. Evelyn seemed to be a devout Christian but it seemed that a great deal of the time, the devil controlled her tongue. And it bothered me that she would get a bee in her bonnet and strike out alone and not tell Thatcher what she was going to do. That trait finally got her into a lot of trouble and danger. I was a little disappointed with the ending but I guess it was the only way the story could end. In spite of the darkness of the story, there was a time or two that I actually laughed at whatever was happening or being said.

I gave the book a four star rating because I could not honestly say that I loved the book and give it five stars.

I would recommend this book only if you are really into dark murder mysteries with a murderer that seems to have a soul that is pure evil.


Deanna Love Gottreu is a 75 year old widow and the mother of two wonderful sons who share second place in her life – with God being in first place. She spends her time reading or making quilts for charity. Her book reviews can also be read on her blog at www.buzzardsroostcrafts.com/blog.
This book was provided by the publisher as a review copy.

Lucy’s Mansion by Deanne Durrett

91MJihThhBL._SL1500_Becca has bought the beautiful Victorian mansion from Lucy Evans and has turned it into a home for battered women and children. Residents of the community are not happy.

Lucy’s Mansion
by Deanne Durrett
Self Published
December 2013

Lucy’s Mansion by Deanne Durrett is a great book and continues the story that was begun in Rogue Trust. Becca buys the beautiful Victorian home of Lucy Evans and converts it into a home for battered women and children. The wealthy residents of the community that surrounds Lucy’s Mansion are doing everything they can to get the women thrown out of the house. Unfortunately, the shelter violates zoning laws which are upheld by the City Council. Becca and J.T. join together to fight the City Council and in the process they realize that they have a strong attraction to each other. There is also a problem with Becca’s twelve-year-old daughter for she keeps saying that second marriages are bad for kids. Becca wants a life with J.T. but she feels that her daughter comes first.

Deanne Durrett has done an excellent in the development of this second story about Becca and her huge inherited fortune. All characters were so well developed that I either loved or greatly disliked them. Only the two society ladies come to mind as ones that I really disliked. Dialogue was right on the mark and the descriptions of scenes were so real that I felt I was right there where everything was happening. Becca’s young daughter, Amy, seemed very real and concerned about her mother and in this book she displays more of the traits or a typical preteen. There was a great deal of suspense in this story. Would Becca or the City Council win the fight over the zoning for Lucy’s Mansion and would Becca and J.T. be able to overcome their problems in their love life? I especially liked the way that the author had the characters depending on God for guidance. I hope that there will be more books in this series for this is a group of characters that I really love and want to follow their lives into the future.

I highly recommend this book to everyone that loves a great Christian romance that also has some suspense and tense moments.


Deanna Love Gottreu is a 75 year old widow and the mother of two wonderful sons who share second place in her life – with God being in first place. She spends her time reading or making quilts for charity. Her book reviews can also be read on her blog at www.buzzardsroostcrafts.com/blog.

This book was provided by the author as a review copy.

The Rogue Trust by Deanne Durrett

81a9P1wIlML._SL1500_Becca McGee is the heir to a huge fortune and she finds her life out of sync because of all the problems that result from the inheritance. She must also deal with J.T. Harrison the lawyer handling the inheritance for he wants to know her better and she wants nothing to do with him.

The Rogue Trust
by Deanne Durrett
Self Published
January 2014

The Rogue Trust by Deanne Durrett is a great story of a young woman who is the heir to a huge fortune that was created to honor a Vietnam war hero. The story begins with Becca receiving a bouquet of fourteen yellow roses and just gets better and better from that point on. Becca McGee is working hard to provide a good life for her twelve-year-old daughter, Amy K. Becca has been widowed for three years but still wears her wedding ring and really has no desire to date. J.T. Harrison is the young, good looking lawyer that is handling the inheritance and Becca seems to think that he is a jerk, a stalker, and an imposter. Neither want to admit there is an attraction and J.T. has his work cut out for him in convincing Becca to accept the inheritance and to give him a chance to get to know her better. The stealing of Miss Honey, Amy K’s cat, is just one of the many events that put a good deal of suspense into the story. One thing that was not in the story that I kept expecting to read was the amount of the inheritance. The reader is only told that it was a huge inheritance and that Becca would be able to do anything that she had ever wanted to do.

The author did an excellent job in the development of all the elements that make up this story. The characters were very believable and nearly all were very likeable. I was living Becca’s life right along with her for I have sometimes day dreamed about what I would do should I be fortunate enough to inherit a large sum of money. Becca’s struggles are real and the author did a great job in the way she portrayed Becca working through each problem. All the scenes were so well scripted that I felt myself taking part in everything that was going on. There were several twists and turns to the plot but each twist just added more to the story. I simply adored Becca’s daughter, Amy K, for it was so good to read a novel with a sweet and obedient preteen. I very much enjoyed the friendships and family interactions that were woven throughout the story along with the characters dependence on God for direction.

I highly recommend this book to anyone that loves a good romance spiced up with a little suspense and that has love and friendship all through the story.


Deanna Love Gottreu is a 75 year old widow and the mother of two wonderful sons who share second place in her life – with God being in first place. She spends her time reading or making quilts for charity. Her book reviews can also be read on her blog at www.buzzardsroostcrafts.com/blog.
This book was provided by the author as a review copy.

All Things Hidden by Tracie Peterson & Kimberley Woodhouse

81K54p9azPL._SL1500_Gwyn Hillerman lives in the Alaskan frontier with her father who is the only doctor in the area and helps him as his nurse. Dr. Jeremiah Vaughan moves to Alaska from Chicago when his medical license is revoked and soon an attraction develops between him and Gwyn.

All things Hidden
by Tracie Peterson & Kimberley Woodhouse
Bethany House
January 2014

All Things Hidden by Tracie Peterson & Kimberley Woodhouse was a most enjoyable story which also taught me some American history. Harold Hillerman felt called to take his medical practice to the Alaskan frontier. He moved his wife and two daughters to Alaska early in the twentieth century but his wife and younger daughter had only contempt for the land and the people and moved back to Chicago. Gwyn stayed in Alaska with her father and worked in the medical clinic with him as his nurse. In the era of the Depression, one of President Franklin Roosevelt’s New Deal projects was The Matanuska Colonization. This brought two hundred families to the area where Gwyn lived and soon her doctor father was greatly overworked. Dr. Jeremiah Vaughan was stripped of his medical license in Chicago, and to get away from the situation and his broken engagement, he moved to Alaska to help Dr. Hillerman who had been his mentor and friend since he was a young boy. Gwyn’s life had been hard since her mother left but she had great friends among the Alaskan natives and she felt that Alaska was the most beautiful place that God created.

The authors did an excellent job in writing this book. Even though it is a fictional story, they accurately presented actual historical events that took place throughout the book. The development of the characters was so well done that they came to life on the pages of the book and I felt as if I knew everyone of them personally. I even found myself taking part in the conversations in my mind. The plot had a lot of twists and turns and just when I had things all figured out, the plot would change. All the scenes were so well written that in my mind I could see exactly what was happening and was right in the middle of the action. Their descriptions of the mountains and landscapes of Alaska were so vivid that I could see them in my mind’s eye and it also made me want to visit Alaska. The story was filled with love, hate, suspense, murder, friendship, romance, forgiveness, and trust in God. I found this story to be uplifting, entertaining, and informative.

I highly recommend this book to anyone who enjoys a great story filled with suspense, romance, murder, history and has vivid descriptions of the beauty of Alaska.


Deanna Love Gottreu is a 75 year old widow and the mother of two wonderful sons who share second place in her life – with God being in first place. She spends her time reading or making quilts for charity. Her book reviews can also be read on her blog at www.buzzardsroostcrafts.com/blog.
This book was provided by the publisher as a review copy.

A Match Made in Texas: A Novella Collection by Mary Connealy, Karen Witemeyer, and Carol Cox

81nFYXvs2RL._SL1500_The town of Dry Gulch, Texas has a matchmaker who is trying to get all her unmarried friends matched up with the perfect man and married. In one story, the tables are turned and the matchmaker is the one being matched up with a future husband.

Match Made in Texas: A Novella Collection
by Mary Connealy, Karen Witemeyer, and Carol Cox
Bethany House Publishers
December 2013

A Match Made in Texas: A Novella Collection by Mary Connealy, Karen Witemeyer, and Carol Cox is a very enjoyable read and provides a lot of laughs and leaves you feeling happy. In the first story, A Cowboy Unmatched, Neill is hired to repair the roof of Clara, a young widow who is also pregnant. Clara is determined that she will never love and marry again but Neill works to change her mind. In the second story, An Unforeseen Match, Clayton is on his way to the Oklahoma Land Rush and stops in Dry Gulch to earn enough money to be able to participate in the land rush. He answers a classified ad put in the paper by Grace but to his surprise it is not the ad he thought it was. In the third story, No Match for Love, Lucy has come to Andrew’s ranch to care for his aunt and her arrival causes many bizarre things to happen.. Lucy and Andrew work together to solve the mysteries and soon other feelings develop between the two. In the fourth and final story, Meeting Her Match, the matchmaker has the tables turned on her as she is now the one being matched up with a possible husband.

All three authors did an excellent job in the development of all the elements in these four novellas. Characters were brought to life on the pages of the book and I found myself cheering each one on and hoping that they would find a true and lasting love. The dialogue was many times extremely funny and gave me some good laughs. Even the serious dialogue was true to life and very interesting. As I was reading the different stories I found myself submerged in the action that was taking place. These three authors have an ability to bring characters and their dialogue to life.

I highly recommend this book to everyone that likes a good romantic story with a happy ending and in this book you get four such stories.


Deanna Love Gottreu is a 75 year old widow and the mother of two wonderful sons who share second place in her life – with God being in first place. She spends her time reading or making quilts for charity. Her book reviews can also be read on her blog at www.buzzardsroostcrafts.com/blog.
This book was provided by the publisher as a review copy.

2013 BookGateway.com Booky Awards

BookGateway.com is pleased to announce its books of the year award, the Bookys, for books published in 2013!

The Booky is awarded annually by the editors of BookGateway.com, a book review website for reviewers and book bloggers founded in 2010 with the express goal of encouraging a lifestyle of continued learning through the love and practice of reading. The Booky awards recognize the best books published and reviewed at BookGateway.com during the preceding year. Each reviewer that submits at least 10 reviews during the calendar year along with each Genre Editor of BookGateway.com can nominate books for Booky award recognition. Final decisions are made by the Managing Editor of BookGateway.com. All Booky award winners will be featured for a month starting in February at BookGateway.com.


Children’s & Teens Book of the Year:
Can’t Wait Willow
by Ziglar and Marten | Ideals Children’s Books | April 2013
From the review by @ashertopia: “This book is genius! The story and the art are partly whimsy and partly lesson. And they work amazingly well together. I highly recommend this book to parents of kids up to 7 or 8 years old.”


Fantasy:
Firebrand
by Philip | Tor | February 2013
From the review by @ashertopia: “From start to finish I was hooked by this story and by this broken young boy who we all know is so much more than we find him. This is only the first book in the series and I’m in line to get the next two. It’s been a long time since I’ve enjoyed a fantasy author’s creation this much.”

The Harbinger
by Huntingford | Self Published | August 2013
From the review by The Golden Reviewer: “An unbelievable good book. This new writer has a vivid imagination that will delight and thrill you as you read this amazing book… I loved the book. It is full of mystery, courage, misplaced loyalty, a mother’s love and just plain good. This is truly a page turner and a keeper.”


Graphic Novels:
Messiah: Origin
by Dorff, Arey and Carpenter | Zondervan | November 2013
From the review by @ashertopia: “The art is where this really shines. The illustrations are so powerful they are emotionally moving. Visually breathing new life in to the birth of Christ… I recommend it to anyone who loves the Word, loves art and may be looking for something truly different.’

Star Wars: Darth Vader and the Ghost Prison
by Blackman and Alessio | Dark Horse | April 2013
From the review by @ashertopia: “Ultimately, this is a story about Vader and how he becomes the monster hinted at in Episode III but fully realized in Episode IV. A fascinating and multifaceted portrayal that sheds light on the once hero, now villain, and one day to be redeemed right hand of the Emperor. Watching and learning from Lord Vader is the highlight of Tohm’s life – and of this book.”


Historical Fiction:
Gunpowder Tea by Margaret Brownley
by Brownley | Thomas Nelson | October 2013
From the review by Deanna Love Gottreu: “The author did an excellent job in the development of the plot. There were many twists and turns that kept me guessing from page to page as to what would happen next. I don’t think I have ever read a novel in which the suspense kept me guessing until almost the very end of the book.”


Non-Fiction:
Gods at War
by Idleman | Zondervan | February 2013
From the review by @ashertopia: “Gods at War is a book that sheds light on a dark part of our lives that we have somehow kept hidden even while openly admitting to other sins. Idolatry just isn’t as well understood in our culture as other sins. We don’t understand how Idolatry is the heart of the other sins we fight against. But if we heed the words of this work we will understand it far too well; uncomfortably well. This book will change your life. If you let it.”

Love the Least of These (A Lot)
by Spielman | Loxafamosity Ministries Inc | January 2013
From the review by @ashertopia: “Whether you are a Christian, Pro Choice, Pro Life, an Atheist or anything in between this book is one of the most clearly and concisely written primers on the Biblical argument against abortion.”


Romance & Chick Lit:
Traces of Mercy
by Landon, Jr. and Kelley | David C. Cook | October 2013
From the review by Deanna Love Gottreu: “All the characters were so well developed that they came alive for me… The fight scene at the beginning of the book was so well done that I could almost smell the smoke from all the guns and cannons. I especially liked the way the authors wove the love of God throughout the story.”


Science Fiction:
Star Wars: Scoundrels
by Timothy Zahn | LucasBooks & Randomhouse Audio | January 2013
From the review by @ashertopia: “This is a great heist story that happens to take place in the Star Wars universe with characters we love written by one of the best Star Wars authors we have. A must have for fans and one of my favorite books of the year.”

William Shakespeare’s Star Wars: Verily a New Hope
by Ian Doescher | Quirk Books | July 2013
From the review by @ashertopia: “I can’t recommend this book high enough. It is perhaps my favorite book of the year, and possibly of several years.”


Thriller & Suspense:
The Shadow Constant
by Scudiere | Gryffin Ink | July 2013
From the review by Golden Reviewer: “Ms. Scudiere is an excellent writer. She brings her characters to life and you feel as if you are sharing their adventure and fears. Ms. Scudiere is one of my favorite authors…Looking forward to the next one with a lot of anticipation!”

The Brick Bible by Brendan Powell Smith

coverIt seems like publishers don’t need much of a reason to print new Bibles with even the slightest deviation of theme. The Men’s Bible, NIV Men’s Devotional Bible, MANual: the Bible for Men, Every Man’s Bible NIV, Every Man’s Bible NLT, Every Man’s Bible (NIV or NLT): Deluxe Explorer’s Edition, Quiet Strength Bible: Men’s Bible Study – those are all real and they are only the very first page of “Men’s Bibles” on Amazon. When will we see something truly different? Enter Brendan Powell Smith and The Brick Bible. But is it a Bible?

The Brick Bible: The Complete Set
By Brendan Powell Smith
Skyhorse Publishing
October 2013

CainandableIn this version, which collects both the Old and New Testaments, the artist/writer of the Brick Bible Brendan Powell Smith created and shot over 2000 different scenes from the Bible’s main stories. It is clear from the start that these are not photos for children. The violence, sexuality and nudity that exists in the Bible is on naked display in the depictions. (Brendan Powell Smith did create some children’s books that avoid some of the messier elements, like Jonah, Daniel, Noah’s Ark, the Christmas Story and such.)

The fact that every scene pictured is built, one brick at a time, is the real joy and accomplishment of this book. It is pure genius! Even seeing how Brendan Powell Smith overcomes issues like height (Saul has a 2×1 white square as his robe then 1×1 flat yellow rounds for legs to make him taller than everyone else, for instance), or outstretched arms (he has connected arms out of socket sideways to have them straight out), are very clever. Further effects with focus and perspective make almost every picture an achievement in itself.

Tdavidhe Old and New Testament have most of their major stories and some minor ones that seem to fit Brendan Powell Smith’s design (see below). You will see a ton of New Testament space spent on Jesus and Revelation, with little time spent on the Epistles, which makes sense since they aren’t visual stories but didactic letters. Understanding the difference in the type of literature of the Bible helps understand why he would or wouldn’t have photos. But in some cases, where there are visual portrayals of certain kinds of literature, specifically apocalyptic, the scenes are very literally envisioned. And in other situations that require interpretation skills, the author relies on English 21st century understanding of words rather than what the words meant originally.

JonathanThe violence and nudity that really help to bring even more distinction to this version of the Bible. So often these are glossed over. Stories about David taking out Goliath, for instance, usually ends with the stone killing Goliath. We gloss over the fact that David then chopped off Goliath’s head like a trophy. When stories in the Bible tell of murder and war, the Brick Bible takes, what looks a lot like, “glee” in telling them in gory, clear red brick building glory. While this is jarring at times it also makes real some of the parts of the Bible that we skip past when reading.

HeavenWhile I enjoyed the honesty in the violence, I didn’t enjoy some of the commentary in the pictures. At times the fact that this is satire is very clear and real. Picture and headings says more about Brendan Powell Smith’s opinions on the subjects he is depicting than allowing proper Biblical interpretation to take place. Instead of exegesis, many times there is simply a very wooden literal reading of the English which is infused with the current meanings and interpretations. For instance, there is no evidence and it is not implied in the original languages or in 2500 to 3000 years of orthodox belief that Jonathan loved David in an erotic way. But in the depictions of their interactions it is clearly set up as a homosexual relationship. Hearts floating above Jonathan’s head – like a teenager with a crush – and when David greeted Jonathan with a kiss it is on the lips rather than what the Bible is saying. Jonathan did love David and pledged his life to him. And in that culture a kiss in greeting was much more akin to what we see in foreign films – a sign of respect. Not an erotic thing. Likewise, headings titled “Genocide” instead of “Judgment” also clearly show Brendan Powell Smith’s wooden literal and bias.

lastsupperI have a ton of respect for what Brendan Powell Smith has done here with Legos and art. I’ve read that he is an atheist and I think that bias comes out in ways that will offend sincere believers – many prospective buyers and readers may be turned off by his choices in what to include and how to irreverantly depict them. Interestingly, in reviewing Brendan Powell Smith’s online site (http://www.bricktestament.com/home.html) you will find some pictures online were redacted or cropped from the published books. I noticed this with scenes that I was concerned with above, where commentary steps the story a little further from orthodox acceptance. If he or the publisher were aware of the possibility of offense and so removed from publication certain scenes it seems like they should have considered what scenes should perhaps have been removed from both. After all, the primary audience of a book about the Bible should be Christians who love creativity and art and also God. But with a focus on satire, and by allowing his bias to color what he selected to depict in such an overt way, it overshadows evertything else and we end up losing some of the primary audience for the much, much smaller satire audience. I’m not sure that was very wise.

JesusEven with the satirical commentary, this is a genius book. It is not Christians who may be offended by visual depictions of some of the seedier stories in the Bible or who may be offended by the way that the author treats a reverant subject in such an irreverant way at times. It is also not for children. But it is for art loving people who enjoy creativity and brilliant photography. It is also for lovers of Lego and the amazing things that toy/tool allows us to do with it. With all my concerns listed I would stistill recommend it to those audiences for this amazing achievement.

To answer the question posed at the start of this review: this is not a Bible. It is a work of art. As long as we think of it like this we may be more inclined to enjoy it for what it is rather than what we believers would want it to be.


@ashertopia is the Managing Editor of BookGateway.com. He is an avid reader and a lifetime learner. His favorite genres include science fiction, fantasy, as well as theology and Christian living. His personal blog is AshertopiA – a land flowing with milk and honey… and a lot of sticky people.

This book was provided by the publisher as a review copy.

Candle Bedtime Bible by Williamson and Tappin

candleIf you read to your kids at bedtime you know that reading from the Bible can be hit or miss. What would really help would be short, bite sized Bible stories that start and end in a set time and are appropriate for your kids. This is that book.

Candle Bedtime Bible
Written by Karen Williamson
Illustrated by Christine Tappin
Kregel
October 2013

This “Bible” is set up in stories that are supposed to be read in 3, 5, or 10 minutes each. There is a directory of the stories included and it is a snap to get right to the story you want. Each story is clearly labeled for length as well. There are over 40 stories from the Bible and all the stories are easy to understand with direct references. The illustrations are very well done.

But not everything is rosy. First, unless you are a speed reader or reading without engaging your kids there is no way you finish these stories in the time frame allotted. It is more like 6, 10, and 20 minute stories. It’s not a big deal but the idea was to get in and out in a set time. If you expect to get through a 3 minute Bible story you will be disappointed (and, really, should you be done with a story in 3 minutes?) Besides, this time expectation doesn’t include discussion time, which is necessary.

Second, everyone is peach colored. I know that some modern Jews have light skin but that is because they were European immigrants. Historical Middle Eastern people have more olive or light brown skin. Is it so bad that we let our children see that Jesus was light brown?

This is a nice bedtime Bible story collection with a couple issues. Still worth your time though.


@ashertopia is the Managing Editor of BookGateway.com. He is an avid reader and a lifetime learner. His favorite genres include science fiction, fantasy, as well as theology and Christian living. His personal blog is AshertopiA – a land flowing with milk and honey… and a lot of sticky people.

This book was provided by the publisher as a review copy.

The Marriage You’ve Always Wanted Giveaway

Marriages either get better or worse.  They never stand still.”  -Dr. Gary Chapman

The Marriage You’ve Always Wanted
by Dr. Gary Chapman
Moody Publishers
2014

When my husband and I married 13 years ago, we were given a copy of Dr. Chapman’s “The 5 Love Languages.”  While I’ve never really been a fan of self-help, psychology books, something about Dr. Chapman’s work struck me as open and honest.  So, when given the opportunity to review “The Marriage You’ve Always Wanted,” I jumped at the chance.

Dr. Chapman’s work specifically details how marriages aren’t easy.  They don’t happen automatically, and they don’t happen without work.  In this book, he details through several chapters how we allow our marriages to drift apart and how we can then find out ways back together.  At the end of each chapter, Dr. Chapman takes readers through several introspective activities.   They are designed to get the reader thinking about their spouse and themselves, making the connection between the information he’s outlined in that chapter and the reader’s own specific situation.

What I like about Dr. Chapman is that he provides examples and anecdotes from both points of view: male and female.  Other books I’ve read by other Christian authors spend a great deal of time talking about how the source of the problem is a failure of the wife to take her more submissive role (Biblically) or the failure of the husband to  assert his authority on the marriage.  Instead, Dr. Chapman outlines key changes that BOTH spouses must make in order to strengthen the relationship.  He does so by also presenting key passages of the Bible for review and reflection.

Overall, I am as pleased as I was with “The 5 Love Languages.”    So much so, that I’m thrilled the generous team at Fly By Promotions has also provided a copy of Dr. Chapman’s book as a giveaway.

Interested?  Fill out the form below:  I’ll be drawing the winner by Saturday, 2/22.

This contest is over.


Robin Gwaro is the Young Adult and Women’s Literature Editor at Bookgateway.com. Her personal blog is Just Wandering. Not Lost. where she writes about whatever comes her way.

 

 

Disclosure (in accordance with the FTC’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising”): Many thanks to Propeller Consulting, LLC for providing this prize for the giveaway. Choice of winners and opinions are 100% my own and NOT influenced by monetary compensation. I did receive a sample of the product in exchange for this review and post.

 Only one entrant per mailing address, per giveaway. If you have won the same prize on another blog, you are not eligible to win it again. Winner is subject to eligibility verification.”

Sluagh: Demon of the Night by Darrell Case

sluagh Max Furman is a serial killer of young boys aged four to seven and he goes undetected for eighteen years. Antoine is Max’s person satanic demon.

Sluagh: Demon of the Night
by Darrell Case
Self Published
October, 2013

Sluagh: Demon of the Night by Darrell Case is a book that grabs you on page one and does not let go until you reach the last page. When Max Furman was a child he was abused by his mother, often telling him that she should have killed him when he was an infant. His heart turns to stone and one day when he is fourteen he kills his baby sister which is his first kill. When Max becomes an adult he becomes a serial killer of young boys between the ages of four and seven and goes undetected for eighteen years. Max has always hidden the bodies where they will never be found but he longs for recognition so he starts to display the bodies of the murdered boys. The FBI starts working the case and the media calls Max the Ghost. Max needs a place to hide so he forges a resume and becomes the pastor of a church. Andrew and Antoine were angels created at the same time and were close friends. When the rebellion came, Andrew stayed loyal to God but Antoine became one of Satan’s demons and Max’s personal demon.

Wow, what an imagination this author possesses which allows him to write such a great story. I read the book in one sitting except for the time I took to attend Sunday night church. I just could not put the book down until I knew what was going to happen and how the story would end. I think this may be the most suspenseful book that I have ever read. The author did an excellent job with every element of the story. The plot had some twists which added to the mystery of the story. Max was so well developed that the reader could see his psychotic character and at the same time see the spiritual warfare that was going on in the story. All the characters in the story came to life and some I truly liked and some I really hated. All the action scenes were so vividly written that I could almost imagine myself right in the middle of the action. Although the story is about a serial killer who murders very young boys, the author balanced the story by writing how God and his angels worked to overcome the evil and to bring about justice.

I highly recommend this book to everyone that likes a very suspenseful Christian story filled with angels and demons and that keeps you on the edge of your seat and biting your nails. I don’t think that I would recommend for anyone under the age of thirteen and then I feel the parent should check it out first.


Deanna Love Gottreu is a 75 year old widow and the mother of two wonderful sons who share second place in her life – with God being in first place. She spends her time reading or making quilts for charity. Her book reviews can also be read on her blog at www.buzzardsroostcrafts.com/blog.

This book was provided by the author as a review copy.

Your Gateway to Great Books!